Shoppers get up early to wrap up Black Friday deals at malls in Massachusetts

Wrentham officials warned of traffic backups as early risers hit the road early on Black Friday to try to get some serious business at Massachusetts stores. The Wrentham Outlets, which were closed on Thanksgiving, opened before dawn. Traffic was stopped on Interstate 495 approaching outlets before 9:00 “Everyone seems happy and nice despite the crazy traffic. It’s the season I guess. If you lose your temper in traffic, reverse direction, go home, eat the leftovers, shop again. Enjoy the sale!” McGrath posted on Twitter. At Burlington Mall, shoppers lined up before 6 a.m. at the Lego store and GameStop. Despite the fact that many stores offered deals before Black Friday, shoppers still want to take advantage of in-person sales’ discounts anywhere from 40, to 50, to 65 — many of these deals are in-store only. Retailers want you in and experience shopping. It’s the touch, try, feel, and buy,” said Sheila Hennessy, of the Burlington Mall. Burlington Mall might look different to some shoppers: There are 33 new stores in the mall. As Black Friday marks a return to familiar holiday shopping patterns, inflation is weighing on consumers. High prices for food, rent, gasoline, and other household costs have taken a toll on buyers. As a result, many are reluctant to spend unless there is a big sale and are more selective with what they will buy, in many cases switching to cheaper stuff and less expensive stores. Shoppers are also dipping into their savings more, turning increasingly to “buy now, pay later” services like Afterpay that allow users to pay for items in installments, as well as max out their credit cards at a time when the Federal Reserve is raising rates to cool the US economy. This year’s trends contrast with a year ago, when consumers bought early out of fear of not getting what they needed due to bottlenecks in the supply chain. The shops didn’t have to discount much as they were struggling to carry the items. The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales growth to slow to a range of 6% to 8%, compared with soaring 13.5% growth a year ago. However, these figures, which include online spending, aren’t adjusted for inflation, so real spending could even be lower than it was a year ago. Adobe Analytics predicts online sales will increase 2.5% from November 1 to December 31, a slowdown from last year’s 8.6% pace when shoppers were uncertain about returning to brick-and-mortar stores. Analysts consider the five-day Black Friday weekend, which includes Cyber ​​Monday, a key barometer of shoppers’ willingness to spend, particularly this year. The two-month period between Thanksgiving and Christmas accounts for about 20% of the retail industry’s annual sales. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Wrentham officials warned of traffic backups as early risers hit the road early on Black Friday to try to snag some serious business at Massachusetts stores.

Wrentham Outlets, closed on Thanksgiving, opened before dawn. Traffic was halted on Interstate 495 approaching the outlets before 9:00am

“Everyone seems happy and nice despite the crazy traffic. It’s the season I guess. If you lose your temper in traffic, reverse direction, go home, eat leftovers, shop one more time. Enjoy the sale!” McGrath posted on Twitter.

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At Burlington Mall, shoppers lined up before 6 a.m. at the Lego store and GameStop.

Despite the fact that many stores have been offering deals before Black Friday, shoppers still want to take advantage of in-person sales.

“Discounts anywhere from 40, to 50, to 65 — many of these deals are in-store only. Retailers want you to walk in and experience shopping. It’s the touch, try, feel, and buy,” Sheila said Hennessy, of the Burlington Mall.

Burlington Mall might look different to some shoppers: There are 33 new stores in the mall.

As Black Friday marks a return to familiar holiday shopping patterns, inflation is weighing on consumers.

High prices for food, rent, gasoline and other household costs have taken a toll on buyers. As a result, many are reluctant to spend unless there’s a big sale and are more selective with what they’ll buy — in many cases, swapping for cheaper stuff and less expensive stores.

Shoppers are also dipping into their savings more, turning increasingly to “buy now, pay later” services like Afterpay that allow users to pay for items in installments, as well as upgrading their credit cards at a time when the Federal Reserve is raising rates to cool the US economy.

This year’s trends contrast with a year ago, when consumers bought early out of fear of not getting what they needed due to bottlenecks in the supply chain. The shops didn’t have to discount much as they were struggling to carry the items.

The National Retail Federation expects holiday sales growth to slow to a range of 6% to 8%, compared with soaring 13.5% growth a year ago. However, these figures, which include online spending, aren’t adjusted for inflation, so real spending may even be lower than it was a year ago.

Adobe Analytics expects online sales to grow 2.5% from November 1 to December 31, a slowdown from last year’s 8.6% pace when shoppers were hesitant to return to brick-and-mortar stores.

Analysts consider the five-day Black Friday weekend, which includes Cyber ​​Monday, a key barometer of shoppers’ willingness to spend, particularly this year. The two-month period between Thanksgiving and Christmas accounts for about 20% of annual retail sales.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Video: Shoppers get up early to take advantage of Black Friday deals

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